Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898 | SUBSCRIBE

Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898

News

Harvard Dismisses Fencing Coach for Conflict of Interest

7.9.19


Harvard has dismissed fencing coach Peter Brand, whose conduct has been found to violate conflict-of-interest policies; the news was originally reported by The Boston Globe.

In a statement released this afternoon, director of athletics Robert L. Scalise said:

In April, Harvard was made aware of allegations involving Peter Brand, head coach of fencing.  An independent investigation of the matter is now complete, and Mr. Brand has been dismissed from his position for violating Harvard’s conflict of interest policy.   

Harvard Athletics is committed to upholding the integrity of our athletics program, and it is our expectation that every coach and staff member adhere unambiguously to our policies.

In a separate e-mail to the athletics staff, he wrote:

As you know, in April, Harvard was made aware of allegations involving Peter Brand, head coach of fencing.  Harvard immediately commenced an independent investigation of the matter, which is now complete.  Mr. Brand has been dismissed from his position for violating Harvard’s conflict of interest policy.

Harvard’s conflicts policy specifically addresses “personal benefit” and states that “[a] conflict of interest exists when individual commitment to the University may be compromised by personal benefit.”  The policy also states that “[f]ailure to disclose possible conflict of interest or commitment . . . may be grounds for disciplinary action and may lead to termination.”  Harvard Athletics is committed to upholding the integrity of our athletics program, and it is our expectation that every coach and staff member adhere unambiguously to our policies.

Coaches and staff should contact program managers, Athletics senior staff, the Compliance Department, or the Office of the General Counsel with any questions regarding potential conflicts or Harvard’s policies.

In the coming days, we will be launching a national search for a new fencing head coach and are committed to having the new coach in place early in the fall.  Should you have any questions, please be in touch with me directly.

 The Boston Globe broke the news of the dismissal this afternoon.

You Might Also Like:

Winthrop House interim faculty deans Mary Herlihy-Gearan and Mark Gearan

Photograph by Kevin Colton

Harvard Appoints Interim Winthrop House Leaders

A screenshot from Curricle, a new tool for exploring the curriculum. The word “curricle” refers to light, open, two-wheeled horse-pulled carriages popular during the nineteenth century. Schnapp chose the name because the word “curricle”—like the English word “curriculum”—derives from the Latin “curriculum,” meaning “race,” “running,” or “chariot.” “Curricle” as a platform name thus invokes the metaphor of the curriculum as an academic vehicle and journey.

Harvard Testing Tool for Curricular Exploration

Prineha Narang (right), assistant professor of computational materials science, works with a student at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

Photograph by Eliza Grinnell, SEAS

Harvard Faculty Entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley

You Might Also Like:

Winthrop House interim faculty deans Mary Herlihy-Gearan and Mark Gearan

Photograph by Kevin Colton

Harvard Appoints Interim Winthrop House Leaders

A screenshot from Curricle, a new tool for exploring the curriculum. The word “curricle” refers to light, open, two-wheeled horse-pulled carriages popular during the nineteenth century. Schnapp chose the name because the word “curricle”—like the English word “curriculum”—derives from the Latin “curriculum,” meaning “race,” “running,” or “chariot.” “Curricle” as a platform name thus invokes the metaphor of the curriculum as an academic vehicle and journey.

Harvard Testing Tool for Curricular Exploration

Prineha Narang (right), assistant professor of computational materials science, works with a student at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

Photograph by Eliza Grinnell, SEAS

Harvard Faculty Entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley