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Nieman Fellow Eliza Griswold Wins Pulitzer Prize

4.16.19

Click on image for full book cover


Click on image for full book cover

Eliza Griswold, a 2007 Nieman Fellow and 2016-17 Berggruen Fellow at Harvard Divinity School, was awarded the 2019 Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction on Monday for her book Amity and Prosperity: One Family and the Fracturing of America. In the book, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux, Griswold follows Stacey Haney, a local nurse in Amity, Pennsylvania, and other residents as a fracking boom hits the area. Reported over seven years, the book describes the consequences of fracking and corporate greed in the small rural town. 

Griswold, who has also written for The New York Times and The New Yorker, among other publications, has previously been awarded a 2015 PEN Prize for translations of the poems of Afghan women, a Rome Prize for poetry, and a Guggenheim fellowship.

Among the staff of The Wall Street Journal, which won the Pulitzer for National Reporting—for uncovering President Trump’s secret payoffs to two women during his campaign—is Rebecca Davis O’Brien ’06, one of this magazine’s former Berta Greenwald Ledecky Undergraduate Fellows. She was a Pulitzer finalist for local reporting in 2014.

Jeffrey Stewart, a professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara, won the Pulitzer for Biography or Autobiography for his book, The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke [A.B. 1908, Ph.D ’18]. Contributing editor Adam Kirsch ’97 assessed Stewart’s book and Locke’s significance in “Art and Activism,” in the magazine’s March-April 2018 issue.

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